On things I really need to stop getting angry about

  • Holes punched on the wrong side of the page and therefore filed upside down (standing on my head is bound to be good for my circulation and flexibility)
  • Papers filed in chronological order, except when they aren’t (looking for the 9th between the 6th and 7th will be second nature soon, and everyone needs more games of hide-and-seek in their lives).
  • Brand new rolls of bubble wrap, unpacked and stood upright to collect dirt on and in both ends (cleaning your packing materials before wrapping things is therapeutic – almost meditative).
  • Files saved under false names and dates (see hide-and-seek above).
  • Papers joined together with paperclips although they should be separate, or not joined when they should be (it’s like a huge free-for-all game of pin-the-tail-on-the-donkey, with multiple donkeys).
  • Finding spelling mistakes in posters, AFTER they’ve been sent off to be hung up (we could offer a prize to anyone who finds them all)

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Can you tell I’m working in the office today??

On playing Chinese whispers

Some families play scrabble.

Some families are less interested in written words and so choose to play Chinese whispers instead.

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DB came home from work really upset the other day. Apparently his father had told him that his (DB’s) mother had said his uncle (C) was in hospital and that his aunt (H) didn’t want to talk about it to anyone, and not to phone for a week or so.

[Background history: DB’s uncle had cancer a couple of years ago, which is now cured, or at least in remission]

We’d spoken to H and C a couple of days earlier and they’d both been fine. C had been tested and was doing well, no sign of anything wrong. They’d sounded happy and life was good.

Except if DB said that his dad said that his mum said that his aunt said that his uncle was in hospital then life can’t be good anymore.

lt must mean something serious like a car crash – or more likely in his case, a bike crash. Or a stroke/heart attack/other terrible unexpected thing. Or the doctors had reread the test results and changed their minds..

Panic was inevitable.

After DB’d asked me if I thought C’d be ok for the 57th time, and I’d had to prevent him booking the first flights out to see them a couple of times, I wrote  H an email.

Turns out H and C had just got back from a routine checkup (for H) but not yet eaten when DB’s mother phoned. Also, they’d agreed to meet C’s cousin at a certain time which meant they were in a rush to eat and get to the meeting point on time – and non-urgent phone calls weren’t at the top of the priority list. The cousin was due to stay for a week, so they would have time to phone once she’d gone home.

Panic over.

***

According to wikihow:
“The game goes on until the last person says whatever they heard aloud and the first person reveals the real message. Compare them and have a great laugh!”

In this case, the great laugh was more like a great sigh of relief.

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On balance, and although I’m generally not a good player of any family games, I think I prefer scrabble…