On the best thing about having one’s own freezer

You can fill it with icecream – and it’s nobody’s business but your own πŸ™‚

A couple of years ago, the last tenant bought a fridge freezer unit to fit the kitchen, and because it’s a weird size, she left it here when she left.

If it was officially made part of the flat’s inventory, the landlord would be responsible for making sure it works which he didn’t want to be or do.

Getting rid of it in order to buy a new one would be ridiculous, so he offered it to me, for free, to use as long as it lives (and to theoretically take with me when I leave).

So it’s mine.

And it’s full of ice cream πŸ™‚

(And pizza, though that’s not as exciting)

***

Once upon a time, in my other flat, I had a chest freezer… Theoretically I still do, it’s just 50 miles away and full of sensible things like homemade ready meals and bread which need eating before it’s moveable. It’s huge, and that’s good too, in a different way from the tiny one I have here. The best thing about it is always having space for leftovers πŸ™‚ and having loads of things to choose from when you don’t feel like cooking.

***

Back to the ice cream.

When your house is full of boxes and things that need cleaning, sometimes the best thing to do is find something to lean on, and lean on it while you eat ice cream directly out of the tub and look at all the things you will do ‘later’…

Which is what I spent a very pleasant half hour or so doing just now πŸ™‚

On egos and builder’s yards

Men are funny creatures.

This afternoon I stood at the service desk with a trolley load of wood panels, waiting for someone to get back from their break and cut them to size.

A man dressed in a smart shirt and shiny shoes stopped his trolley neatly behind mine, and started heaving a packet of roofing felt off a shoulder high pile. The packet was a good metre long and about 30 pieces thick. It turns out roofing felt is heavy…and flexible (;)) He tugged at one end and was surprised when it bent in the middle. Puffing something that sounded like criticism of the “idiots who pack roofing felt” he tugged again.

After watching him for a while, I offered to take hold of the other end and help him heave it down together.

He declined politely and continued to struggle and puff and pant until there were 4 packages more or less neatly arranged on his trolley. Then he pushed his trolley away without a word.

Is there a man-rule against accepting help from women when picking up unwieldy things in building centres?

On keys (and castles)

According to a worn out proverb/saying/phrase, an Englishman’s home is his castle.

This English girl has a new Castle πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚

I don’t have a moat, or even a pond*, but I do have a balcony (and a cellar). And 60 square metres of floor all to myself. (Wheeeeeeee!)

I signed the papers on Tuesday, got the keys on Friday, and have been gradually collecting furniture to put in it. (That’s a future post in it’s own right).

Not your typical castle door, I’ll have to get some decent black hinges organised πŸ™‚
​

I haven’t moved yet. The landlord has a few things he needs to change/mend/work on first, and since I had 2 exams at the weekend (yet another future post) and still need to sort out an electricity company, and wash the floor, and pick up some more shelves and a bed, and move all of my things, I can’t see that it’s a problem. After 3 1/2 years (or 4 depending on how you’re counting) I reckon a week here or there is mostly irrelevant.

* another post – there are so nany things to write out of my head…

***

Hallo luffly peoples, I am going to try catching up on all your posts and comments and what-have-yous soon. Life’s a bit crazy at the moment, but I’m planning to have a more relaxed summer πŸ™‚

On finding the cage door

Postcard:
“Take the time to do the things that make you happy”
​

I picked up this postcard because of the message in the middle. I didn’t notice (don’t ask me how) that it was covered with pictures of keys and an open cage.

I am one step closer to opening my own cage, so it seems appropriate.

On cages

All cages, even the golden ones, have doors for a reason.

The trick is finding out how to open them.

(And whether or not you want to) 

On not being a sword

I swung my legs over the side of the bed and sat on the edge while she waved her hands about.

“…your body wants to flow, you see,” she said, “it’s being held in place at the moment, but it isn’t happy. That’s why you have so many stressed and tightened muscles. You’re more like water. Water’s powerful, but it’s not a sword. You aren’t a sword….”

I expect she had more to say, my osteopath, but I don’t remember what; I was trying to work out what to do with those ideas.

***

Since then, my thoughts keep wandering back to the image of water trying to fight like a sword, or trying to be a sword.

***

The way I see it, water tends to flow round or over the things that get in its way. It doesn’t fight everything, at least not immediately. I have the feeling that when it does fight, water tends to fight more slowly than swords do.

It’s not weak though, even if it is slow. All the ravines and canyons, all the hilly landscapes, all the washed-away sea breakers and man-made constructs, all the round stones on the riverbed/at the beach, prove that. And the amazing lack of unrounded shards of glass on the beach show that it doesn’t always take as much time as one thinks.

The rain falls drop by drop. Even tsunamis and floods take their time to build up to the finale. But when they go, they go. When they’re ready, they make themselves known, often with catastrophic results.

There are very few ways to permanently keep water from going where it wants to go. Dams break, pipes burst, riverbanks overflow, the tide comes in, regardless who commands it to stay away.

Pretty much eveything natural shows how much water can achieve, given enough time. Not only in big crashy ways, but also in small, hidden ways.

All things need water. Nothing survives long without water. In fact, there’d be no life at all without water. The whole planet only exists the way it does because there’s water on it. The blue planet. our blue planet. The only one I want to live on, even if they reckon they’ve found another 10 out there in space. (But I digress)

Swords, on the other hand, aren’t known for their life-giving properties. l suspect lots of people could imagine the benefits of the public still having swords and swordfights but I don’t know anyone who can’t live without one.

***

When someone tells me I’m not something, I immediately wonder why not, and whether they meant that in a good way (or not), and whether they were hoping I was or are happy that I’m not, and whether I was aiming to be that thing at all and whether I should have been…. (etc etc etc ad infinitum).

In this case, after quite a lot of thought, I think I’m pleased to not be a sword. And if I’m not a sword, water’s not a bad thing to be instead.

πŸ™‚

On sleeping in my car

Okay, so it was nothing like a Roxette song, but it was an adventure. There’s not much more freeing than packing your stuff into the back of your own car and driving into the sunset. And there’s not much more grown up than realising when you are really really tired and should stop to sleep instead of charging on towards a goal regardless of all danger..

***

Lorries, even sleeping lorries, are loud. Lorries full of animals are cruel at the best of times, but are especially cruel when they have to travel so far that there are overnight stops. Those animals are [understandably] even louder than the refrigerator lorries.

The rain, when it falls, is loud. The choice between fresh air and a wet car is difficult to make while half asleep.

The seats are only so long. I’m a fairly short person and my car is fairly big, but my feet spent a lot of the night trying to find something to rest on/against.

The sun comes up on its own terms. There are no curtains in a car. You can’t choose when to turn the lights on. You get what the weather fairy gives you.

There are many things which could be considered suboptimal.

But. None of them cancels out the sense of adventure and the feeling of being alive. In fact they add to it.

So would I do it again?

You bet!

πŸ™‚

On ice cream and no spoon

My younger self spent many (MANY) hours sitting on benches in various parks and town squares, eating icecream. Sometimes by myself, sometimes with friends, sometimes (and probably most often) with my siblings.

This was such a common occurrence, that we each kept an emergency spoon in our bags or wallets.

Yesterday I found myself alone in a new town, with a couple of hours to kill. It was incredibly warm, I had my luggage with me so I couldn’t do much easy sight seeing,  and to be honest, I really couldn’t be bothered to go anywhere or do anything. Sometimes doing nothing is the best thing to spend time doing.

On the other hand, I hadn’t drunk anything since early in the morning, and dehydration isn’t fun. 

I walked from the train station to the nearest supermarket and looked at all the ice creams on offer. Then I remembered that I no longer carry my spoon with me.

It’s been years since I had opportunity to use it… That was extraordinarily upsetting. I don’t know how I let such an integral part of my identity slide so far without even realising it.

In the end, I bought a packet of mini-milks. They have wooden sticks and taste like walking home from school as a little kid.

That was an adequate substitute, but I intend to find my spoon when I get back, and put it back in its rightful place in my purse.

πŸ™‚